Bayer MaterialScience in Germany and Pittsburgh is sampling customers with carbon nanotubes produced under the name Baytubes.
Bayer MaterialScience in Germany and Pittsburgh is sampling customers with carbon nanotubes produced under the name Baytubes. The company has developed a new process for making these electrically conductive particles on an industrial scale with consistent purity and “considerably lower cost than before,” according to the company. Up to now, variable quality and high prices up to $550/lb or more have limited industrial use of nanotubes, Bayer says. The company sees potential markets in electrostatically paintable automotive parts, antistatic films for packaging electronic components, and EMI shielding of computer and cell-phone housings. The tubes have a maximum average diameter of 50 nanometers—10,000 times thinner than a human hair.