CONTROLS: Gefran Adds New Pressure Sensors for Extrusion & Injection

At the recent K 2013 show in Dusseldorf, Gefran brought out new pressure sensors for extrusion and announced the acquisition of a Swiss maker of pressure sensors for injection molding.

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At the recent K 2013 show in Dusseldorf, Gefran Spa of Italy (U.S. office in Wnchester, Mass.) brought out new pressure sensors for extrusion and announced the acquisition of a Swiss maker of pressure sensors for injection molding.

New products from Gefran include Performance Level ‘c” versions of its oil-filled melt-pressure sensors for extrusion (pictured). They are designed for increased safety and to comply with the latest revision of European standard EN1114-1 related to the safety requirements of extruders. These sensors have auto-diagnostics that detects any fault condition, as well as an integrated relay that changes state in case of overpressure or exceeding set limits. The oil filling of these sensors is “Generally Recognized as Safe” by the U.S. FDA.

Gefran also introduced the series H high-temperature pressure transmitters with strain-gauge technology and a variety of filling fluids. Series H is designed to communicate via HART protocol (Highway Addressable Remote Transducer) with open architecture. This protocol for bidirectional communication allows digital data to be transmitted and received over analog networks that link digital devices to control systems. HART communication involves simultaneous transmission of both digital and analog signals.

In addition, Gefran announced the acquisition of Sensormate AG in Switzerland, which makes a range of high-precision load cells and strain sensors. Addition of these products strengthens Gefran’s offerings for injection molding—especially sensors for electric-drive machines. Sensormate products are suited to monitor tiebar strain, mold protection, and injection pressure.

(781) 729-5249 • gefran.com

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