A surface micro-pattern of parallel dashes in a cross-hatched overall pattern, which is so small it is difficult to feel or see, is enough to keep dangerous microbes from attaching to the film surface.

A surface micro-pattern of parallel dashes in a cross-hatched overall pattern, which is so small it is difficult to feel or see, is enough to keep dangerous microbes from attaching to the film surface. Sharklet Technologies Inc., a newly formed bio-tech company in Alachua, Fla., is commercializing micro-scale surface topographies based on patented research led by Dr. Anthony Brennan at the Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (U.S. Pat. 7143709). Sharklet intends to commercialize a film for a hygienic surface as its first product and expects to have samples filed with the FDA by the end of the year. All other known anti-microbial products involve drugs, metals, or chemicals, which can lead to developing resistant bacteria. Micropatterning is embossed with rollers, pressure, and heat on film or sheet, or could be molded onto the surface of medical devices. So far, Sharklet and its production partners have worked primarily with rolls of acrylic, silicone, and PET sheet. They have also found ways to inspect the nearly invisible pattern. (368)418-0078 • www.sharklet.com