An article on nanocomposites in the May issue of Plastics Technology (p. 76), included a mislabeled photo.

An article on nanocomposites in the May issue of Plastics Technology (p. 76), included a mislabeled photo. The published photo showed the results of compounding different nanoclays in semi-rigid PVC. The label and caption incorrectly described the photo as heat-aging of polypropylene nanoclay composites. The two correctly labeled photos are shown here. Semi-rigid PVC samples were mixed for 8 min at 170 C. Samples containing 5% by weight of bentonite or hectorite nanoclays from Elementis Specialties, Inc., Hightstown, N.J., show signifi cantly less degradation when the clays were modifi ed with proprietary second-generation surface treatment. Even less color change is apparent in the hectorite samples. The PP samples were aged at 150 C in air for 24 hr. The samples display no signifi cant degradation of the PP/hectorite nanocomposite as compared with the PP/bentonite nanocomposite, which darkened and crumbled apart after aging. Elementis claims to have the world's largest and purest deposit of hectorite in California. Tel: (609) 443-2552 . www.elementis-specialties.com

Elementis Specialties Inc
Wyckoff's Mill Rd PO Box 700
Hightstown, NJ 08742
Phone (609) 443-2000 Fax (609) 443-2207