Know How - Extrusion

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Published: 5/25/2015

EXTRUSION: Cooling: The Critical Function in Extrusion
Figuring out how much cooling your process needs is complicated. But there are ways to approximate.

Published: 4/27/2015

EXTRUSION: Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Run Your Extruders Dry
At least not for longer than a few minutes. The thin film that’s captured between the screw flights and barrel wall supports the screw and acts as a lubricant. Without it, galling can occur.

Published: 3/31/2015

Extrusion: What’s the Best Way to Vent?
There are advantages and disadvantages to each, and they must be evaluated before making a decision.

Published: 2/22/2015

EXTRUSION: Are Grooved-Feed Extruders Right for You?
In specific circumstances, this design can increase output and reduce melt temperature. But grooved feed throats are not for every application.

Published: 1/27/2015

EXTRUSION: Avoid General ‘Pump Ratios’ On Two-Stage Screws
Instead, rely on basic data and calculations to determine the proper depth of the first and second metering sections

Published: 12/29/2014

EXTRUSION: About Your ‘General-Purpose’ Dies
There is no such thing. While dies can be adjusted to provide some flexibility, the fact is they are optimized for one specific output of one particular polymer.

Published: 11/24/2014

Understanding Solids-Bed Breakup in Barrier Screws
Barrier screws all but eliminate problems associated with solids-bed breakup. But if they do occur, tremendous pressures can develop, causing screw wear.

Published: 10/23/2014

EXTRUSION: Why Bother to Chrome Plate Your Screws?
It doesn’t add that much to the overall cost and can improve performance and facilitate maintenance. So the better question is: Why not?

Published: 9/22/2014

EXTRUSION: Double Flights Are Not a Cure-All
There are certain applications where double-flighted feed sections make sense, and others where they don’t.

Published: 8/25/2014

EXTRUSION: Why Barrier Screws & Rigid PVC Don’t Always Mix
RPVC’s somewhat unusual melting mechanism makes it unsuited to traditional barrier type designs.