Additive Manufacturing

Exploring the: Additive Manufacturing Zone

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Published: 5/19/2017

Continuous-Build 3D Demonstrator Unveiled by Stratasys
This modular 3D printing system is targeted to low-volume continuous production and mass customization.

Published: 5/4/2017

Molding 2017: News in 3D Printed Molds & Conformal Cooling
Two of the hottest topics in tooling today are additive manufacturing (3D printing) and conformal cooling—often with the former as a means to the latter.

Published: 4/18/2017

The Next Game-Changing Technology in Tools and Dies
The first conformal-cooled tools entered the European market 25 years ago; a new conference aims to determine what the next 25 years could hold.

Published: 4/17/2017

TPE for Additive Manufacturing with SLS Process
CRP Technology’s Windform RL touted as ideal for functional prototypes and parts.

Published: 4/5/2017

More High-Performance Materials for Additive Mfg Emerge
Included are high-temperature formulations for 3D-printed tooling.

Published: 3/28/2017

Proto Labs Finds Millennials Upbeat on Manufacturing’s Future
Survey indicates increased optimism and changing perceptions about the industry among those from their late teens to late 30s.

Published: 3/23/2017

Space: Where 3D Printing Innovates?
It’s called the “Final Frontier” but maybe space is actually a closer to a present-day trendsetter. What does that mean?

Published: 3/22/2017

Arburg ‘Technology Days’-6700 Visitors and Several Novelties
The first metal-powder injection molded smartphone frame, PP-IML containers molded in under 2 sec, a new additive-manufacturing development center, and hints of innovations yet to come.

Published: 3/14/2017

Additive Mfg. Materials Evolve as Market Moves from Prototyping to Production
Both Stratasys and Arkema have recently launched new materials with improved aesthetics and performance.

Published: 12/23/2016

3D-Printed Plastic Molds: K Exhibit Would Make You a Believer
Perhaps you have heard that additive manufacturing—a.k.a. 3D printing—can be used to make injection tooling inserts out of plastics—relatively quickly, at relatively low cost, and with little human labor involved.