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5/28/2013

Copolyester Debuts in Luxury Drinkware Collections

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WEB EXCLUSIVE: Tritan proprietary copolyester from Eastman Chemical Co., Kingsport, Tenn., is used in new luxury drinkware/tableware  collections by both BarLuxe, Lenexa, Kansas and Taiwan’s Tzeng Shyng.

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WEB EXCLUSIVE: Tritan proprietary copolyester from Eastman Chemical Co., Kingsport, Tenn., is used in new luxury drinkware/tableware  collections by both BarLuxe, Lenexa, Kansas and Taiwan’s Tzeng Shyng. Tritan boasts toughness, dishwasher durability, excellent clarity, and is free of bisphenol-A.

BarLuxe has launched three new lines made with the material: Staxx drinkware, designed for establishments that serve drinks, has a compact storage footprint and features an inner ledge for easy removal of stacked beverageware. It comes in 1.5- and 2-oz shot glasses as well as on-the-rocks and tall sizes. BarLuxe’s Vintage collection consists of wine glasses in fluted design, tulip shape, and multipurpose stemmed and stemless versions. Carafe, a companion to Vintage, has a screw-on lid and flip-open spout for easy pouring.

Tzeng Shyng produces a line of extrusion blow molded stemmed and stemless wine and champagne glasses made with Tritan copolyester for major retailers including Sam’s Club, Wal-Mart, Target, and Pottery Barn. The material allows the company to use existing molds to create its line of Retain drinkware and tableware.

 

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