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2/2/2012

New Partnership for EVOH/Nanoclay Barrier Compounds

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WEB EXCLUSIVE: Nippon Gohsei of Japan, maker of SoaranoL EVOH resins, has obtained an exclusive global license for use of O2Block Barrier additive from NanoBioMatters Industries S.L. of Spain.

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Nippon Gohsei of Japan, maker of SoaranoL EVOH resins, has obtained an exclusive global license for use of O2Block Barrier additive from NanoBioMatters Industries S.L. of Spain. Nippon Gohsei will market SoarnoL NC compounds of EVOH with the surface-modified nanoclay. By adding a “tortuous path” type of physical barrier, the nanoclay is said to dramatically improve the barrier properties of EVOH with minimal impact on processing or transparency. Nippon Gohsei has sampled the new grades and plans a commercial introduction this year. SoaranoL is sold here by Soarus L.L.C., Arlington Heights, Ill. NanoBioMatters North America is in Boston.

 

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