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10/25/2018

How to Tackle Outgassing Problems in Injection Molding

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Gas and air entrapment can cause a variety of problems in injection molding, including part burns, short shots, voids and blemishes, even clogged vents. Vacuum venting can solve all these problems, and increase output in the molding process.

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Proper venting is essential to molding a defect-free part. Without it, air and gas are trapped in the mold, which compress and heat as the cavity fills. Trapped gas is one of the most common causes of part burns, and it can also lead to short shots and voids, blemishes and discernible knit lines that weaken the part.

Moreover, trapped gas can cause residue buildup in vented pins, which then necessitates frequent production interruptions to clean the tool. It can even cause corrosion of the tool steel, thereby increasing tool-maintenance costs.

Most injection molders know that, of course. But what do you do when conventional venting methods just don’t work? Vacuum venting can alleviate all these problems by instantaneously evacuating air and gas from the mold cavity as it is filled...READ MORE.