Feeding & Blending | 1 MINUTE READ

Double Planetary Mixers Granulate and Dry

High-precision mixing, granulation and vacuum drying in a single vessel.  

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The Ross Double Planetary Mixer is billed as an ideal machine for high-precision mixing, granulation and vacuum drying—all in a single vessel. Powders and granules are gently blended by two rectangular planetary blades that rotate on their own axes while orbiting the mixing zone on a common axis.

Atomizing spray nozzles enable controlled and spill-free addition of liquid raw materials as the mixing blades continuously ensure uniform composition and temperature throughout the batch.

As a result, granulation and drying procedures can reportedly be completed in significantly shorter times compared to conventional, non-vacuum granulators and dryers.

Granulating & Drying in Double Planetary Mixers

Optional features for sanitary and sensitive mixing applications include flush discharge plugs or valves, covers for use with the portable mix vessels during transport, and controls integrating the mixer with auxiliary equipment such as vacuum pumps, heating/cooling units, load cells, etc.

Ross’s own Systems & Controls division supplies pre-programmed and pre-wired controls for fast installation and start-up.

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