Extruded Sorghum Loosefill

Technology to foam granular sorghum protein into loosefill “peanuts” was first developed in the early 1990s by Biofoam Corp. in Phoenix, Ariz.

Technology to foam granular sorghum protein into loosefill “peanuts” was first developed in the early 1990s by Biofoam Corp. in Phoenix, Ariz. But the firm closed in 1998. The technology was acquired and improved by Milex Corp., Pampa, Texas, which was set up in 2003 to sell the sorghum raw material and lease food-type extruders to make it. Milex now has eight licensees and produces about 40 million lb/yr of the raw material, which it sells with a two-year price guarantee. Bio-derived and biodegradable Milex foam reportedly has cushioning properties comparable to EPS but is less expensive, even at twice the density (0.05 g/cc for Milex). The cereal-like material is mixed with water and extruded with singlescrew food extruder, which has no heaters. The screw generates frictional heat, which turns the moisture to steam and foams the cereal. Milex peanuts can be compressed into blocks or sheet. (806) 665-0809 • www.milexcorp.com

Milex Corp.
800 E Kingsmill Pampa, TX 79065
Phone (806) 665-0809 Fax (806) 665-5515 

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