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4/11/2013

MATERIALS: Nylon Grades for Water-Injection Technology

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WEB EXCLUSIVE: BASF Engineering Plastics (U.S. office in Wyandotte, Mich.) has two new grades of Ultramid A nylon 66 optimized for water-injection technology (WIT).

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WEB EXCLUSIVE: BASF Engineering Plastics (U.S. office in Wyandotte, Mich.) has two new grades of Ultramid A nylon 66 optimized for water-injection technology (WIT). WIT enables injection molding of hollow plastic parts with larger internal space and smoother inner surfaces than are provided by gas-assist injection. The new grades supplement hydrolysis-resistant Ultramid A3HG6 WIT, used for automotive cooling pipes. The new additions are:

 

•Ultramid A3HG6 WIT Balance with 30% glass fiber and bead boasts improved hydrolytic resistance, making it particularly suited for components that carry coolant or that come in contact with water. The addition of nylon 610 in this compound enhances stress-crack resistance to calcium chloride road salt.

 

•Ultramid A3WG7 WIT, reinforced with 35% glass fibers, is well suited for tubes that convey oil such as those utilized for dipsticks, or for other components that have to meet high demand in terms of oil resistance, stiffness and dimensional stability.

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