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8/30/2013

Nylon 4T Used in Next-Generation DDR-DIMM Sockets

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Stanyl ForTii nylon 4T from DSM is said to be the only halogen-free, high-temperature nylon that answers the stringent requirements of reflow soldering for DDR-DIMM sockets.

Stanyl ForTii nylon 4T from DSM Engineering Plastics, Birmingham, Mich., is being selected by major OEMs that have started to use DDR3-DIMM (dual in-line memory module) sockets in the latest generation of blade servers. Currently, the DSM material is said to be the only halogen-free, high-temperature nylon that answers the stringent requirements of reflow soldering for DDD3 sockets as well as demand for high melt flow in complex molds and extremely low warpage in finished parts.

The new-generation blade servers pose a more challenging set of demands on components due to their new chassis design and thermal, power, and airflow conditions. They require components with low height, for example, to compensate for the use of DIMMs incorporating a higher number of chips. In addition, specifiers demand plastics that are entirely free of flame retardants that contain halogen or red phosphorous. Moreover, they want good colorability to provide DDR3-DIMM socket differentiation.

Stanyl ForTii meets all these conditions and is also suitable for wave and reflow soldering. It was selected for a new generation of ULP DDR3 sockets after tests were carried out on it alongside various LCPs (liquid crystal polymers) and PPAs (polyphthalamides).

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