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12/22/2008

Teknor Apex Gains Exclusive License For Starch-Blend Bioplastics

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Last month, Teknor Apex Co., Pawtucket, R.I., signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Montreal-based Cerestech, Inc.

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Last month, Teknor Apex Co., Pawtucket, R.I., signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Montreal-based Cerestech, Inc. The license covers technology for blending low-cost thermoplastic starch (TPS) granules into a masterbatch that can be mixed with bioplastics like PLA or PHA, or with petrochemical-based polymers. TPS blends use starch from corn, wheat, tapioca, and potatoes. Field trials with film extruders and injection molders reportedly show that blends with 30% TPS maintain or exceed the mechanical properties of products made from 100% PE, PP, or compostable resins. Says John Andries, Teknor Apex senior v.p. of technology, “The Cerestech technology yields blends that, even at high starch loadings, retain a substantial portion of the mechanical properties of the bioplastic or synthetic base polymer. They exhibit lower levels of sensitivity to moisture than many other starch-containing plastics and are translucent, printable, and sealable. They can be formulated for biodegradability.” Teknor plans to start production of these blends at a new pilot plant this year. Teknor is also prepared to sub-license the technology to others for in-house compounding. (800) 556-3864 • www.teknorapex.com (514) 893-2089 • www.cerestech.ca

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