End Markets | 1 MINUTE READ

Testing: Vertical Spectrophotometer for Hard-to-Measure Materials and Shapes

Datacolor’s SpectraVision V vertical model measures and digitally communicates the color of “unmeasurables” for expanded applications. 
#color

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The latest addition to the SpectraVision family of spectrophotometers from Datacolor, Lawrenceville, N.J., is said to obejectively measure and digitally communicate color measurements for the “unmeasurables”—or, multi-colored, textured, small-sized and irregular-shaped materials. SpectraVision V reportedly  increases efficiency by reducing the steps to match and approve color.

The new vertical configuration, sample tray and cup enable customers to measure a wide variety of samples, such as plastic pellets, watch components, electronic parts, and much more. High resolution sample images taken by the hyperspectral spectrophotometer can also be leveraged for onscreen color evaluation and communication of colorimetric data.

Said president and CEO Albert Busch, “With the new vertical configuration and enhancements to the Datacolor Tools SV software, we are able to extend the benefits of objective digital color management to multiple industries and customers. Customers with previously unmeasurable materials, whether due to its size, shape, texture, or applications can now conduct consistent, repeatable, objective color measurements, result in increased efficiency, reduced costs and faster time to market.”

RELATED CONTENT

  • Bracing for Possible Supply Shortage of Nylon 66

    PolySource, for one, has been preparing for this with alternatives it offers. How big is this concern? Who’s working on solutions, including alternative offerings?

  • MIDs Make A Comeback

    3D molded interconnect devices were supposed to be the 1980s' breakthrough for plastics in electronics—but they flopped. New processes that make market entry faster, simpler, and less costly have recharged MIDs' prospects.

  • Novel High-Temperature Nylon Debuts

    A new class of semi-aromatic, high-temperature nylons is being introduced to the U.S. by Kuraray America in N.Y.C.