• PT Youtube
  • PT Facebook
  • PT Linkedin
  • PT Twitter
8/3/2012

Low-Emission Acetal Meets Daimler’s Strict New Limits for Vehicle Interiors

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Germany’s Ticona Engineering Polymers is offering new-generation, low-emission, Hostaform acetals which meet Daimler’s new, stricter limits for formaldehyde emissions of acetal vehicle-interior components.

 

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Germany’s Ticona Engineering Polymers (U.S. office in Florence, Ky.) is offering new-generation, low-emission, Hostaform acetals which meet Daimler’s new, stricter limits for formaldehyde emissions of acetal vehicle-interior components. The first use of the material is in seat-cover fastening systems for the latest Daimler B-Class.
 
Starting this year, Daimler prescribes stricter limits on acetal emissions than even Guideline VDA 275 of the German Association of the Automotive Industry. Ticona has a specification limit of <2 ppm (2 mg/kg) for uncolored natural grades, and <5 ppm (5 mg/kg) for colored or custom grades. Together with Ticona and Johnson Controls, Milwaukee, the challenge to meet Daimler’s new guidelines with the new XAP2 grades was led by A. Raymond of France, a manufacturer of metal and plastic fastener systems for the automotive industry.
 
Low-emission Hostaform XAP2 has scratch and impact resistance and heat stability required for many applications that are subject to high degrees of wear or stress in the vehicle interior. These include both visible and concealed components such as functional and safety components, seat components such as head rests and lumbar support, fastening solutions in the door area, and trim for door elements, IP panels, and center consoles.

 

RELATED CONTENT

  • Melt Flow Rate Testing–Part 1

    Though often criticized, MFR is a very good gauge of the relative average molecular weight of the polymer. Since molecular weight (MW) is the driving force behind performance in polymers, it turns out to be a very useful number.

  • Injection Molding Wood-Plastic Composites

    Injection molders are just becoming acquainted with this new class of molding materials. It pays to learn some basic processing guidelines before jumping in.

  • PBT and PET Polyester: The Difference Crystallinity Makes

    To properly understand the differences in performance between PET and PBT we need to compare apples to apples—the semi-crystalline forms of each polymer.


Resources